Dealing with Chilblains

Chilblains are a relatively common problem when the weather is colder. They are a painful and itchy reaction of the small blood vessels in the toes to the changes in temperature. They results in a painful red patch, that later becomes a dark blue color if they become chronic. They have recently been getting some extra publicity in the mass media due to them being more common in those infected with coronovirus, getting the name, COVID toes.

Chilblains are a seasonal problem and occur in all countries in which the climate gets cold enough to cause the reaction in the skin. An episode of PodChatLive had a deep look at the problem of chilblains:

The best way to deal with chilblains is to prevent them by keeping the feet warm. If a chilblain does develop then it needs to be kept warm and the protected to prevent the skin from breaking down. There are various chilblain creams that can be used to help to stimulate the circulation.

Helping Severs Disease

Severs disease or calcaneal apophysitis is a prevalent condition of the heel bone in developing children. At the rear of the heel bone is a growth area that most of the development of the heel bone occurs at and this problem is an overuse injury of that growing area. It is more prevalent in children which are active, are overweight and are taller. The common signs of Severs disease is soreness at the back and sides of the heel bone, particularly after activity. Severs disease is regarded as a self limiting disorder, because the child will always at some point grow out of it when growth of the heel pain stops and the developing area of cartilage inside the bone combines with the rest of the heel bone. That doesn’t indicate it shouldn’t be treated and may not be helped before that growth ceases.

This episode from PodChatLive was a comprehensive discussion into the issue of Sever’s disease/Calcaneal apophysitis:

A great way to handle this problem can be managing the child’s and parent’s expectations as well as way of life to maintain the signs and symptoms under control. The strains must be controlled via modifying and limiting activity levels. This could be difficult and could require some negotiation with the child. If the discomfort is severe after sports activity, then ice can be used to help reduce that. Often a cushioned heel insert might help protect the heel. Long term the prospects is good as they will outgrow this by the mid-teenage years.